Cutting and Labeling

The cutting process is long, tedious, and frustrating because even after noise reduction the noise floor is much higher than I’d like.

For each note I have to find the onset, and then cut it at the closest zero crossing.

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 9.41.28 PM

I also have to find the end of the decay, which including the reverb, is subtle and can be difficult to ascertain. Again once I find the end point I have to cut it at the closest zero crossing.

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 9.40.58 PM

Once I have all the notes cut, I listen to them for any clicks and pops, meaning that I missed the zero crossings, and to make sure that I have all of the notes in order, with no doubling, or messed up notes. After that’s all said and done I can start labeling. Despite the samples being in different keys, I am labeling them in the spirit of the organ, where each stop, no matter the octave, is centered on C4. With the 61 Key manual that means that samples range from C1 to C6, in the bastardization of scientific pitch notation I am using to label my files. This system equates the physical location of the key on the manual to the label, as opposed to the pitch.

Screen Shot 2014-04-04 at 10.43.11 PM

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